3000 Level Courses

LING 3040 3.0 - Historical Linguistics

This course is an introduction to the study of languages as they change through time, and to the related topics of dialect geography and linguistic prehistory. We will study methods for constructing earlier stages of a language, such as the comparative method and internal reconstruction. Processes of changes in phonology, syntax and lexicon will be addressed. The main languages emphasized are English, French and their Indo-European relatives, but examples and problems will cover a variety of languages and language families.

Prerequisite: AP/LING 2120 3.0, or permission of the department

LING 3060 3.0 - Linguistic History of English

A study of the principal changes in the English language from Anglo-Saxon times to the present day.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: GL/EN/LIN 4606 6.0; AS/LING 4060 3.0 (prior to Fall/Winter 2001-2002).

FORMAT: Two 90-minute sessions weekly.

PREREQUISITES: AP/LING 1000 6.0 or AP/LING 2060 6.0, or permission of the Department.

LING 3120 3.0 - Phonology 2: Theory

This course builds on the skills acquired in AP/LING 2120 3.0. Students will continue with problem sets from a variety of languages, while being introduced to key issues in current phonological theory.

FORMAT: Two 90-minute sessions weekly.

PREREQUISITES: AP/LING 2110 3.0 and AP/LING 2120 3.0, or permission of the Department.

LING 3140 3.0 - Syntax 2: Theory

This course focuses on core aspects of syntactic theory from a Minimalist perspective. Concepts covered in AP/LING 2140 are assumed throughout. Topics discussed include argument structure, VP shells, properties of functional categories, Case theory, head and XP movement, and DP structure.

FORMAT: Two 90-minute sessions weekly.

PREREQUISITES: AP/LING 2140 3.0, or permission of the Department.

LING 3150 3.0 - Semantics

This course is an introduction to topics in formal semantics. The emphasis is on providing students with an understanding of a wide range of semantic phenomena by adopting a truth-conditional account of meaning using a limited formal apparatus. Topics covered include propositional and first order logic, modality and possible worlds, definite and indefinite descriptions, event semantics and tense and aspect.

PREREQUISITE: AP/LING 1000 6.0 or AP/LING 2060 6.0, or permission of the Department.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: GL/EN/LIN 3611 3.0

LING 3160 3.0 - Discourse Analysis

This course provides an introduction to discourse analysis, that is, the analysis of spoken and written texts in context. Central issues examined include: the relation between linguistic form and function; the relation between text and context; and the question of 'textuality' (i.e. how a randomly-ordered set of sentences is distinguished from a coherent 'text'). Approaches to discourse analysis covered include speech act theory, interactional sociolinguistics, critical discourse analysis and conversation analysis.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: GL/EN/LIN 4608 3.0

FORMAT: One 3-hour session weekly.

PREREQUISITES: AP/LING 1000 6.0 or AP/LING 2060 6.0

LING 3210 3.0 - First Language Acquisition

This course provides an introduction to children's acquisition of linguistic knowledge, including lexical, morphological, phonological, syntactic, and pragmatic development, and familiarizes students with fundamental issues in current theoretical models of language acquisition. In addition, children's use of processing strategies for comprehension and production and the roles of cognitive and social development will be examined.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: None.

FORMAT: Two 90-minute sessions weekly.

PREREQUISITES: AP/LING 1000 6.0 or AP/LING 3220 3.0 / AP/PSYCH 3290 3.0

LING 3220 3.0 - Psycholinguistics

This section of the course approaches the psychology of language from the perspective of linguistics. After a brief introduction to language structure, the main focus of the course will deal with issues concerning the kinds of representations and processes used to produce and comprehend speech; that is, how are words and grammatical structure stored and used? Topics covered include speech perception, word and sentence comprehension, speech production, language and the brain, and language and thought.

FORMAT: Two 90-minute sessions weekly.

PREREQUISITES: AP/LING 1000 6.0 or HH/PSYC 1010 6.0 with a minimum grade of C. 25 spaces reserved for Linguistics majors.

LING 3240 3.0 - Second Language Acquisition

This course provides an introduction to second language acquisition. Issues discussed include linguistic, biological, cognitive, socio-psychological, and socio-educational aspects of second language acquisition. A variety of theoretical models are also considered.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: GL/EN/LIN 3606 3.0.

FORMAT: One 3-hour session weekly.

PREREQUISITES: AP/LING 1000 6.0 or AP/LING 3220 3.0 or HH/PSYC 3290 3.0.
Note: Students who have taken AP/LING 3230 3.0 may not enrol in this course.

LING 3400 3.0 - Sociolinguistics

This course provides a survey of theoretical and methodological issues in the study of language variation and change, using the framework of variationist sociolinguistics. Topics include: the sociolinguistic variable; variable rules; phonetic and phonological variation; grammatical variation; language-internal constraints on variation; style; social class and social networks; speech communities; sex/gender; ethnicity; language change; and language acquisition.

PREREQUISITE: AP/LING 1000 6.0, or permission of the department.

LING 3410 3.0 - Writing Systems

This course deals with the interaction of spoken language and writing structure. Topics such as the origin and development of alphabetic writing in the ancient Near East and its later development in Greek and Roman cultures will be studied.

A close look at various modern orthographies will also be undertaken, including Cyrillic, Arabic and Hebrew alphabets, and systems of the Indian sub-continent, Korea, China and Japan. Orthographic reform and literacy will also be discussed, as well as recent developments of orthographic conventions in digital media, particularly in cross-cultural contexts.

FORMAT: Two 90-minute sessions weekly.

PREREQUISITES: AP/LING 1000 6.0 or AP/LING 2060 6.0, or permission of the Department.

LING 3440 3.0 - Bilingualism

This course takes a sociolinguistic approach to the study of bilingualism, with specific focus on the social factors which give rise to and constrain bilingualism, and the linguistic consequences of language contact. Topics include: societal bilingualism and diglossia; linguistic minorities in law and education; language maintenance and shift; and language mixture. Special emphasis is placed on the most common manifestations of language mixture — borrowing and codeswitching — and the social and linguistic factors which constrain their use.

FORMAT: Two 90-minute sessions weekly.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: None.

PREREQUISITES: AP/LING 1000 6.0, or permission of the Department.

LING 3600 3.0 - Socio-Political Issues in Second Language Teaching

All second language teaching and learning takes place within a complex socio-political, cultural and economic context. The TESOL professional can analyze this context and understand its influence on the classroom.

This course examines the context of TESOL and considers how various issues influence and inform such elements as classroom methodology, leadership, administration, program design, the role and responsibility of the teacher, the teacher as leader and change agent. Students are encouraged to select and analyze issues that are relevant to the particular context within which they are, or expect to be, teaching.

FORMAT: One 3-hour session weekly.

EVALUATION: TBA
PREREQUISITES: None.

Note: This course does not count towards Linguistics major/minor credit. Enrolment is restricted to those students in the TESOL program.