4000 Level Courses

LING 4060 3.0 - Canadian English

This course provides an overview of the history, linguistic structure and sociolinguistics of English as spoken in Canada. Topics include: the roots of Canadian English; phonetic and grammatical characteristics; differences from other Englishes; regional variation; and issues in current sociolinguistic variation and change, with specific focus on Toronto.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: AS/LING 4060 3.0, GL/EN/LIN 4610 3.0.

FORMAT: One 3-hour session weekly.

PREREQUISITES: AP/LING 2120 3.0, AP/LING 2130 3.0, AP/LING 2140 3.0, and three credits in linguistics (LING) at the 3000-level course, all with grades of C+ or higher, or permission of the Department.

LING 4120 3.0 - Advanced Phonology

This course concentrates on recent advances in phonological theory within a generative framework. Specific topics include constraint- vs. rule-based approaches to phonology, segmental representation, markedness, and the relation between phonetics and phonology.

FORMAT: One 3-hour session weekly.

PREREQUISITES: AP/LING 3120 3.0 with a minimum grade of C+, or permission of the Department.

LING 4140 3.0 - Advanced Syntax

This course aims at providing students with an in-depth understanding of the interaction between theoretical assumptions, analysis and data in syntax. The course concentrates primarily on Minimalist approaches to raising and control, PRO, Case features, (wh)-operators, and phases.

FORMAT: Two 90-minute sessions weekly.

PREREQUISITES: AP/LING 3140 3.0 with a minimum grade of C+, or permission of the Department.

LING 4150 3.0 (F) - Topics in the Syntax-Semantics Interface

This course explores issues at the syntax-semantics interface. Topics include the interaction between case, aspect and DP type, the distinction between syntactic versus semantic arguments, and structural encodings of discourse related properties such as topic-comment, theme-rheme, and focus-presupposition structures in various languages.

INSTRUCTOR: Gabriela Alboiu

PREREQUISITES: AP/LING 3140 3.0 with a minimum grade of C+, or permission of the Department.

FORMAT: One 3-hour session weekly.

EVALUATION: TBA

TEXTS: No textbook. Various readings from the primary literature.

LING 4220 3.0 - Acoustic Phonetics

An investigation of acoustic-phonetic aspects of speech and their relation to speech perception and recognition. Practical experience in techniques of acoustic-phonetic research.

Prerequisite: AP/LING 2110 3.0 and AP/LING 2120 3.0 with grades of C+ or better, and at least six credits in linguistics (LING) at the 3000-level with grades of C+ or better, or permission of the department. AP/LING 3120 3.0 is recommended.

Course credit exclusions: None.

LING 4230 3.0 - Language and the Brain

This course focuses on the relationship between the human brain and comprehension, production, and acquisition of language. It surveys a variety of language disorders, such as aphasia, delayed language development, dyslexia and language dissolution in old age.

PREREQUISITES: AP/LING 2120 3.0, AP/LING 2140 3.0, AP/LING 3220 3.0 (or AK/AP/SC/PSYC 3290 3.0) with grades of C+ or better, and at least 3 additional credits in linguistics (AP/LING) at the 3000 level with grades of C+ or better.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: None.

LING 4240 3.0 - Theoretical Issues in Second Language Acquisition

An examination of the relationship between linguistic theory and second language acquisition including the nature of second language learners' linguistic representations from both linguistic and neurolinguistic perspectives, the role of universal grammar, and elicitation and interpretation of second language data.

PREREQUISITE: Completion of AP/LING 3240 3.0 (formerly 3230 3.0) with a grade of B+ and AP/LING 3120 3.0 and AP/LING 3140 3.0 with grades of B, or permission of the department.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: None.

LING 4250 3.0 - Evolution of Language

This course examines the evolution of human language, drawing on comparisons of various non-human communication systems with human language, and on different theoretical approaches to the structure of human language and the interrelation of various components of the linguistic system.

PREREQUISITES: AP/LING 2120 3.0 and AP/LING 2140 3.0 with grades of C+ or better, and at least six credits in linguistics (LING) at the 3000-level with grades of C+ or better, or permission of the department. AP/LING 3220 3.0 is recommended.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: None.

LING 4320 6.0 - Field Methods

This course provides students with the skills and techniques necessary to conduct independent linguistic field work.

PREREQUISITES: AP/LING 2110 3.0, AP/LING 2120 3.0, AP/LING 2130 3.0 and AP/LING 2140 3.0 with grades of C+ or better, and at least six credits in linguistics (LING) at the 3000-level with grades of C+ or better, or permission of the Department. AP/LING 3120 3.0 and AP/LING 3140 3.0 are recommended.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: None.

LING 4350 3.0 - Pidgin and Creole Linguistics

Pidgins and creoles are languages that develop from contact between groups of people having no common means of communication. This course examines the historical and social circumstances in which such languages arise, their linguistic characteristics and their relevance to linguistic theory.

FORMAT: One 3-hour session weekly.

PREREQUISITES: AP/LING 2120 3.0, AP/LING 2130 3.0, AP/LING 2140 3.0 and at least six credits in linguistics (LING) at the 3000-level, all with grades of C+ or better, or permission of the Department.

LING 4400 3.0 - Research in Sociolinguistic Variation and Change

This course is a practical introduction to sociolinguistic research. We discuss methods of sociolinguistic data collection, including surveys, the sociolinguistic interview and participant observation, and quantitative methods, including summary measures, tests of statistical significance and variable-rule analysis. Working individually and in groups, students gain experience in all stages of sociolinguistic research and write an original research paper.

FORMAT: One 3-hour session weekly.

PREREQUISITES: AP/LING 2120 3.0, AP/LING 2130 3.0, AP/LING 2140 3.0, and three credits in linguistics (LING) at the 3000-level course, all with grades of C+ or higher, or permission of the Department. AP/LING 3400 is recommended.

LING 4440 3.0 - Syntactic Change

This course deals with morpho-syntactic change from a generative perspective. The general questions addressed will include the following: Why are some grammatical features better preserved and why do others disappear? How do changes in some aspects of the grammatical system affect other aspects of the grammatical system? How do small innovations come to have big effects? What kind of role do social factors play in grammatical variation and change? What limitations are there on the role of language contact in grammatical change?

From the perspective of theory, some of the leading questions are as follows: Is an independent theory of change necessary (i.e. in addition to a theory of grammar)? How do we reconcile the Minimalist view of language as a kind of "perfect system" with the presence of variation and the occurrence of change? Is it possible to reconcile biological and social approaches to the study of language change? What is the status of grammaticalization as a process of language change? How do we model the effects of language contact?

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: AS/LING 4800B 3.0 (prior to Fall/Winter 2000-2001).

FORMAT: One 3-hour session weekly.

PREREQUISITE: AP/LING 3140 3.0 with a grade of at least C+ or permission of the Department.

Note: students who have taken AS/LING 4800B 3.0 Special Topics : Topics in Grammatical Change may not register in this course.

LING 4900 6.0/3.0 - Individualized Reading

This course may be offered by agreement among a senior student, a faculty member, and the Department.

PREREQUISITE: completion of 24 credits in the LA&PS

EVALUATION: Minimum 70% for written work (minimum two pieces)